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Author Topic: Biking / Cycling  (Read 15157 times)
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marley mission
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« on: June 23, 2010, 09:19:54 AM »

Just thought I would start an official thread on this topic (I will sticky)
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« on: June 23, 2010, 09:19:54 AM »

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Larrruh
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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2010, 02:05:46 PM »

Ahh nice! I just went for my first bike ride in my Sprints this morning. I got new tires on my bike too and it was the first time trying them out, both went great. Smiley

Although, does anyone have the problem of toes squishing up in their VFFs? They fit me very snug and I think well otherwise, but while biking I suppose because of my foot constantly pushing into the toe pockets, it gets cramped.
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2010, 02:33:50 PM »

I have been wearing my evos for the biking - I tried my vibes - they wear ok but i like the evos better on the pedal with the sole being a little more firm

its funny - i am new to biking - so much to learn - this am my wheel came out of true so i am on my way to get a spoke wrench this pm to try and fix as the wheel is slightly rubbing against the chainstay (whole new vocab to learn)

i picked up bike maintenance for dummies and i am determined to learn how to take care of my equipment myself before upgrading my bike

right now i have a 20 years old murray mountain bike - now - i hardly used it in 20 years so it was still in good shape when i brought it to the bike shop for a tune up

i initially though i was gonna get a new road bike (thinking about races / duathlons, etc) but currently i have been enjoying jumping off road and into my local trails so i think my uograde might be a mountain bike after all - we'll see

not a cheap sport to get into btw - since i ride at 4am i had to get a light system and a bunch of other startup stuff - its cool though - taking a cross training mentality has refreshed me physically and mentally - enjoying my running more and feeling much less 'banged up'
 
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2010, 02:54:54 PM »

I'm new to biking also, you already sound much more well-versed than me! I just enjoy riding around the neighborhood or to the bank (I'd be riding it to more useful places if I didn't live in the suburbs with completely unfriendly narrow roads). But I'll be transferring colleges in the spring hopefully to a more urban setting and I'm looking forward to leaving my car at home. Smiley So I've got to build up my bike skills for then.
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2010, 02:54:54 PM »

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« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2010, 09:04:32 PM »

I wear my KSO's every time I go out on my bike.  I used to ride barefoot, but the grips on my pedals (I have a mountain bike designed for rough terrain and the pedals are metal with grips that are more like spiked torture devices) hurt my feet.  I've never had any issues with my feet slipping off the pedals and I can get a comfortable grip without cutting or bruising my feet up.

I'm not a serious cyclist.  I just ride for fun (on and off road), but my VFF's have served me well and made my feet happy.  Grin
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12 pairs of VFF's: 6 KSO (1 grey/palm, 1 blue/camo, 2 black & 2 grey/fuchsia), 2 Classic (black & lilac), 2 Bikila (magenta/orange & silver/verde), 1 Speed (black/white), 1 Sport Trek (Champagne/Red) Proud vegan
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« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2010, 01:10:19 PM »

I am recently returned to biking...used to do both road and off-road in the 90's.  So far, I've not been wearing VFF's for it.  I'm in the top-of-foot-pain phase of VFF adjustment apparently, and putting on stiff biking shoes and going hard for 2 or 3 hours without bothering my feet is a nice counterpoint to the walking and running I'm easing into.  I also intend to go back to clipless pedals soon.  One of the advantages in biking is that you can use other muscles and get more power by "lifting" the pedal on the upstroke in addition to the pushing downstroke.  I haven't heard yet from anyone who has biked in VFF's and used straps to this end.  If it comes recommended, I may give it a try.

Marley, I know what you mean about the mountain bike.  I have some fat-but-smooth tires (a little knobby at the edges to help with crossing grass and dirt but smooth on pavement) on my old mountain bike and am enjoying it.  I know from experience that with the same effort that is taking me 25 miles I could be going much farther and faster on a road bike, but I love being able to just leave the pavement to hit some interesting piece of terrain when the need or the whim arises.  There are many shortcuts and detours I take that would be ugly on my road bike!
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« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2010, 03:57:55 PM »

I'm so glad this thread was created!  I've been contemplating taking to the road in my VFFs - on my bike, of course.  Biking was mentioned in another thread, and I'm not sure it was recommended. 

Next time I jump on the bike, I'll be sure to bring the VFFs along for the ride and report back!
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Jessica
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« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2010, 04:15:05 PM »

I will mention that in one of those other threads, somebody said that the "golfball" arch portion of the soles on their Bikilas was damaged by their pedals.  I would personally not want to damage my Bikilas (or Sprints if I had them) on a bike.  Anyone looking to experiment with VFF's and biking might want to use any of the other models with the all-rubber sole.  Just sayin.
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« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2010, 04:34:58 PM »

my evos are holding up well with my biking - just did a 40 miler the other day and 25 this AM

really getting into biking - learning alot too

the other day had two flats - same tire - in the dark - well - i only had one tube so after i popped that i had a 4 mile hike home with the bike on my shoulder - good workout actually - was pleased that i could change the tires effectively lol

the reason for the flats wear a wire thread that poked out of the tire and punctured the tubes (old tires) - anyway - got a new rear tire to go with the new rear rim i purchased the day before as my old rim was banged up and beyond repair

just did my first lube on the bike today

reading my biking maintenance / repair for dummies trying to up the IQ

i am currently having some gear issues - not sure if it is the cassette being too worn, a chain or derailer issue? i have to bring the bike in to see

big question - do i keep pouring money into this ol bike or just poney up for what i believe to be my upgrade bike - a cyclocross bike
i definetly want a bike that goes faster on the road that i could use in a future road race but i also want to be able to go off road too - the bike shop guy told me a cyclocross model was the way to go - thoughts...
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« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2010, 04:52:40 PM »

I will mention that in one of those other threads, somebody said that the "golfball" arch portion of the soles on their Bikilas was damaged by their pedals.  I would personally not want to damage my Bikilas (or Sprints if I had them) on a bike.  Anyone looking to experiment with VFF's and biking might want to use any of the other models with the all-rubber sole.  Just sayin.

Good to know.  I haven't been planning on wearing my Bikilas on my bike, but now I definitely won't.  I'd hate to ruin them.  Undecided

So far, my pedals haven't hurt my KSO's at all, but I suppose time will tell whether they'll eventually show wear and tear from the grips.
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12 pairs of VFF's: 6 KSO (1 grey/palm, 1 blue/camo, 2 black & 2 grey/fuchsia), 2 Classic (black & lilac), 2 Bikila (magenta/orange & silver/verde), 1 Speed (black/white), 1 Sport Trek (Champagne/Red) Proud vegan
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« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2010, 01:33:53 PM »

my evos are holding up well with my biking - just did a 40 miler the other day and 25 this AM

really getting into biking - learning alot too

i am currently having some gear issues - not sure if it is the cassette being too worn, a chain or derailer issue? i have to bring the bike in to see

big question - do i keep pouring money into this ol bike or just poney up for what i believe to be my upgrade bike - a cyclocross bike
i definetly want a bike that goes faster on the road that i could use in a future road race but i also want to be able to go off road too - the bike shop guy told me a cyclocross model was the way to go - thoughts...

It's cool to see you getting into biking!  I enjoy how low-impact it is compared to running and walking, not to mention how much ground can be covered with the same energy. 

A cyclocross bike would definitely work.  Budget is a consideration, but my personal view on your current bike would be to ditch it before sinking much into it.  The frame is the key to the bike, and I don't think Murray was ever known for making good ones (could be wrong, and no offense intended!).  Steel frames tend to weigh a little more (though not as much as you might think) and flex more, which provides a smoother ride.  Aluminum can be very light and is very rigid, which can mean feeling more vibration from the road, but also feels very tight and responsive--especially climbing and sprinting.  My wife and I both found solid old (early '90's) Cannondale mountain bikes on Craigslist and fixed those up.  Hers was a $50 frame that we built up with ebay and discount parts, mine was a $200 working bike that got a new seat, tires and fork to improve the fit and ride. 

In any case, I would recommend finding a good frame that fits you well.  My own feeling is that it's better to get the low-end version of a nicer bike--a good frame with cheaper components, then upgrade parts one at a time as the need arises.  The stuff that turns out to stand up over time will be money saved.  The stuff that you upgrade will be something you picked out specifically (which can be fun), leading over the years to a bike that is more customized for YOU and with money spent only where you found it necessary or desired.  This is all based on the fact that I've always been on a budget, though.  I'm sure if I'd had the chance, I would gladly have just bought some brand new hot bike and been done with it!  Wink

That said, what are the gear issues you're having?
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marley mission
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« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2010, 02:01:55 PM »

the gears 'hesitate' when i drop down gears and then they drop with a heavy feel if that makes sense - also - the lowest gears seem to occupy the same cog and then at the highest gear i cant get the chain to ride up to the last cog - its an old bike - is it the cassette - the derailer - the chain? not sure - i am gonna bring it in to get it addressed but i also might be pulling the trigger within the next few days on a road bike (prob a giant defy model) - trying to stay around 1000$
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« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2010, 02:54:10 PM »

The hesitation/heavy thing could be old corroded cables sticking in old dirty cable housings.  New cables and housing is not too expensive and you could just have the bike shop replace all that for you as part of a tuneup.  Just spraying a little lube (WD40 is NOT lube!) into each end of each section of housing, as well as the  derailleur and then working back and forth through the gears could help.  I'd start there to see if it might buy you some time to shop for another bike.

The cog/gear issue is hard to be sure what you mean, but I can say that you really shouldn't ever be running from the biggest chainring up front to the largest cog in back (or smallest to smallest for that matter).  The same gearing can be had using a straighter line (viewing the chain from behind, parallel to the frame) that leaves more slack for the derailleur to play with.  If you're unable to get to the smallest cog while using the big chainring (your highest/tallest gear ratio), then you may just need to adjust the derailleur.  There are a couple of little screws for this on each derailleur--to set the outer limits of motion and to line up the chain with the cogs.  Your "for Dummies" book I'm sure does a better job of explaining adjustment than I could.   Wink

A new road bike sounds like a blast!  Good luck.   Grin

PS:  http://www.sheldonbrown.com/
If you haven't already come across him, Sheldon Brown was THE guru of all things bicycle.  Many excellent articles, advice, instruction and ideas on his site.  He just passed away recently, but is still the go-to resource!
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marley mission
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« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2010, 02:30:08 PM »

update -

fixed mountain bike - a derailer adjustment and also picked up a road bike - a giant defy model - wow - that thing can move - lol - not used to the speed yet - tommorrow will be first real test w it - will report back

thanks for the site link anderson - good deal
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« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2010, 02:59:01 PM »

update -

fixed mountain bike - a derailer adjustment and also picked up a road bike - a giant defy model - wow - that thing can move - lol - not used to the speed yet - tommorrow will be first real test w it - will report back

thanks for the site link anderson - good deal

Sweet!  The Defy looks like a pretty sweet bike and I know I've seen some on the trail--usually passing me like I'm standing still.   Cheesy  I made my old Klein road bike into a single-speed because I'd heard so much about how great that is--light, simple, inexpensive, liberating, blah blah blah.  I'm not a fan.  Hopefully this fall I can afford shifters, derailleurs, gears and get back in with you fast folk!
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