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Author Topic: CamelBak for day hike question  (Read 5745 times)
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vice69
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« on: October 14, 2011, 12:41:29 AM »

Hey all,

I have a question for day hikers or hikers/trekkers in general.

i got invited on a day hike by my cousin here in a couple weeks and along with my VFF KoSpo's i plan on brining a (sweet Army issue) CamelBak 100oz pack with me and snacks and such.  i was thinking i'd like to add a powdered something to the water like gatorade or Emergen-C just to give it a little kick and re-balance electrolytes and such throughout the day.  what do you suggest, if anything at all? i personally believe plain water can't be beat but for a day hike i'm willing to go outside the box.

thanks for any input!
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« on: October 14, 2011, 12:41:29 AM »

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noelbodwell
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2011, 05:49:22 AM »

It has been the experience of people in my hiking group that any time a fluid other than plain water is used in the camelback or other water bladder, the chance of that disgusting black moldy gunk showing up increases. I think it has to do with sugar that is in the mix. Consequently I just use plain water in mine and carry a small plastic bottle with an energy drink in addition to my water bladder. Four years and not a speck of mold in the bladder.

Enjoy your hike!
Noël
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JustinB
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2011, 08:45:10 AM »

I don't remember who it was, but I know they went on a long hike or long run and they talked about elecrolyte pills/supplements.  Maybe they will post in here.
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vice69
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 11:15:23 AM »

ahh, yes.  didn't think about it gunking up the works.  definitely don't want that.  i'll probably throw a couple of those liquid energy things in my pack.  like the PowerBar ones or something. 

although i do like the pill idea.
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 11:15:23 AM »

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skye97
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2011, 01:47:02 PM »

I agree that you don't want to add anything to your hydration bladder.  I've done that before and it was a bad idea!

My favorite snacks to bring hiking are dates and nuts.  The dates are great because they provide natural, unprocessed sugar for quick energy and tons of magnesium and potassium, while the nuts provide protein and salt.  Before stumbling upon this combo I tried Clif Shot Bloks because I was getting really bad cramping in my calves on steep hikes, and not only did they not help my calves, but my blood sugar would crash an hour later since they're basically pure sugar.  I've had much better success with the dates and nuts.  Plus they're whole foods, which in my opinion is always better than a pill or supplement.

Anyway, have fun on your hike!
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vice69
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2011, 02:15:09 PM »

awesome! thanks!
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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2011, 01:35:59 PM »

Not much of a hiker but I do go on some fairly long runs (3-4+ hours) and agree wholeheartedly about just water in bladders, had to replace mine as I experimented with powdered Gatorade Endurance and the mystery black took over the tube. Never really like the consistancy of gu's so I've moved on (with good results) to just regular foods, my current favorites are fig newtons, pretzels and PB&J, all of which are easily carried in a snack size zip lock bag, not to mention my chia seeds with a teaspoon of agava nectar in my little bottle that was initially bought to carry gu's.

Just my two cents, have fun!!
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« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2011, 05:48:08 PM »

go old school and make some Chia-Fresca...Keep it in a seperate container and drink from it when you need to replenish.  Seemed to work for the Tarahumara.   Wink

No, I haven't tried it yet, notice how I said Yet, but I got no problem eating weird foods and trust me--it looks weird!   
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2011, 09:01:11 PM »

going for a hike thursday!!  going to try out my komodos and the dates and nuts snack idea.  don't have time to make the chia fresca this week, but hopefully next time. the chia drink looks good to try.  anyway im excited to see how i hold up in the komodos.  hopefully i won't die but my legs are getting stronger so i think i'll be ok.
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« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2011, 04:42:33 PM »

Just a few thoughts of a moderately experienced hiker (nothing extreme, lots of dayhikes and a couple of 5-12 days backcountry hikes with occassional stops in a shelter/hut):
I would also go for the dates and nuts idea ... and throw in some raisins, dry apricots, papaya or pineaple dices, banana chips, dried cranberries or similar. I always take a bag of such mix for multiday hikes.
However, make sure that you are keeping i in a good, sturdy bag ... raisins, nuts and (semi)dirty clothes inside the backpack do not mix well ;-).
For a day hike, you do not have to be that restricted by weight, volume and durability of the food, and bulkier items are not banned ... a couple of apples, some non-messy sweets (such as shortbread/gingerbread), or bread + (dry) sausage are a good idea. A good dry sausage lasts quite well for a couple of days on the trail. On the other hand, chocolate is a bad idea, unless the weather is cold (dark, high percentage cocoa chocolate survives warm temperatures better than milk chocolate, which gets messy fast).
As for vegetables - tomatoes are fine for the first day or two, but they are high-risk in terms of mess. Bell peppers last a bit more, and raw onion is an absolute winner. (YouŽll become a bit stinky yourself when reaching the onion-only stage, anyway).
Cooking on the trail is yet another art ... I swear by instant soups, ramen noodles, instant porridge and a moderate amount of old-fashioned heavy tinned meat ... it is worth trading a bit of weight in the pack for an occassional proper warm meal. No sardines, though - but that may be just a personal preference, and nothing what needs more than 5 minutes of real cooking (I am a bit paranoid about running out of fuel).
As for drinking - it is always plain water during the day and tea in the morning and evening. I am staying away from hydration bladders; an empty soda bottle is great for carrying water - it is light, cheap, and I have no qualms throwing it out when back in civilization.
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« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2011, 05:14:48 PM »

those are fantastic ideas gryllus.

so we ended up doing a 13 mile hike yesterday and i brought the camelbak i mentioned above with a small waist pack rigged to it to carry a ziplock of a nut mix and another with dried dates, pineapple and apple slices and my wallet and such.

the little pack i rigged up was fine for what we did but i'd like to look around more and find one that is bigger and i can secure more firmly and flatter up against the camelbak. actually i have a pic of my set up from yesterday. the 100oz bladder was filled to the top and the little back full of snacks, and it wasn't heavy at all.

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gryllus
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« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2011, 03:58:24 AM »

You ARE going light, indeed!
I usually carry a more substantial pack - currently a 24+4 liter Vaude Wizard for dayhikes (so that I do not have to carry extra clothes around the waist) and a 55 + 10 l Deuter pack (also known as "the pig") for multidays, often with stuff (such as the sleeping pad and water bottle) attached to the outside.It does look rather impressive, especially with a rain cover:
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vice69
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« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2011, 06:19:04 AM »

holy jeez. haha. wow you go for broke.

yeah for day hikes i figured i got all i need in that little set up right there, besides needing a more efficient pouch attached in the future.  i like being more agile when im hiking and that's about as light as you can get without completely going without gear. haha. however, once i get my VFF classics ill be bringing my Komodos along with to trade out if my feet get too sore.  i have no idea how ill accomplish that. haha other than that, i love my set up!

 streamlined, baby!
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« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2011, 03:32:19 PM »

Well, it was not as bad as it looked - most of the volume is that oversized raincover pulled over a rolled sleeping pad... and half of the pack itself is sleeping bag and clothes (you need quite a bit when camping close to a glacier ;-). This was probably my maximum setup ever - carried on a 10 days holiday in Norway that included a 5 days trek in the Hardangervidda. I have since exchanged that large foam pad for an inflatable one that fits inside the pack. That trek was also remarkable by the fact that we had no base camp/storage place, so we also had to carry all the time one set of decent city clothes for the flight back.
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vice69
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« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2011, 05:31:48 PM »

oh wow.  that sounds like an amazing trip.  the gear doesn't sound too bad at all.
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