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Author Topic: How to Correct a Bunion - Naturally  (Read 140364 times)
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iain
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« Reply #45 on: April 01, 2010, 11:19:06 AM »

I wonder where Dr. Ray McClanahan peer reviewed research is on this? It does seem like it would work for deformed feet but I'm not sure you could wear Correct Toes with VFFs. Smiley
If it really does work then it certainly would be a favourable alternative to surgery.
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« Reply #45 on: April 01, 2010, 11:19:06 AM »

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hinogi
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« Reply #46 on: April 01, 2010, 11:38:17 AM »

Call me a septic but it all sounds fishy to me. From my understanding the human body is designed to adapt, if you put shoes on your feet your feet will adapt to the shoes and I guess everyone knows what causes that may have from deformation to joint pain and posture defects. But if you remove the shoes from your feet your feet will also adapt and your toes will spread out when they need to and so they will regain a natural position according to their use.
So I don't get why I should force my toes to spread permanently and maybe tip my body off balance because he is not used to it?
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iain
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« Reply #47 on: April 01, 2010, 04:47:46 PM »

And I'm assuming people who use Correct Toes wear them in shoes, which would miss the point.
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« Reply #48 on: April 05, 2010, 10:41:56 AM »

Sorry if someone has already brought this up.

I have bunions too and want to point out that no footwear can COMPLETELY correct them.  While you might see some great improvement in the direction and position of your big toe, those of us who have had bunions for any extended period develop bony changes to that joint (see the lump on the side of a foot with bunions).  Bunion correction surgery usually involves removing a portion of this bone.

That being said, I have had no bunion related pain from VFFs and definitely notice better range of motion and slight straightening of my big toes.  We will see what happens in the long term though.  Who knows?
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« Reply #48 on: April 05, 2010, 10:41:56 AM »

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Hallufox
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« Reply #49 on: July 01, 2010, 06:30:13 PM »

The only reason why I  got the Vibram Five Fingers were my bunions on both feet. I didn't really think about the other benefits of walking barefoot, but it really seems to be interesting.

I got my KSOs three days ago and just took a few walks where I usually go running. On the way to that area it's asphalt and pavement, then it's gravel and some forest tracks. When I was 7 I started Tae-Kwon-Do and quit when I was 18/19. Back then we also did outdoor barefoot jogs through the snow. Anyway, I can really tell that my feet are not used to walk barefoot anymore.

In my normal shoes and my running shoes I've been wearing orthodics for years to conquer my flat and splayfeet. Had them in normal shoes when I was a kid, but didn't need them in running shoes (according to my doc back then) since those supported my arch enough. When I had some knee problems a few years ago I got orthodics for my running shoes, but also changed my running stile to a more mid-foot strike and also a way more smooth body motion. I'd say I'm more conscious when running and listen to my body. No heavy heel strikes anymore, not even when I'm running downhill.

Anyway, getting back to the bunions. I have them since I was a kid and actually always thought that would be normal. I just remember one time when I Tae-Kwon-Do examiner complained that I wouldn't take it seriously since I wouldn't have the correct foot placement during the basic position. A few months ago I somehow read something about bunions/hallux valgus and decided I may have to do something about that one day. In the beginning of May I did a 20 minute run on a small island with the majrity being sand. One the one hand I didn't use my normal running shoes and on the other I hadn't run on sand in years. Afterwards and also the next day I had lots of pain in the joints of my big toes while walking. That's when I bought the bunion aid splints from Hallufix and have been wearing them nearly every night since then: http://www.hallufix.org/english/index.html

These were my feet on May 13th:

Feet loose on the ground:


Flexing the toes:


Toes were aligned by hand and then the feet were pressed to the ground:



When my feet are loose on the ground it still looks pretty close to the first pic. When I flex my toes while standing and then let them 'down' on the ground again I can clearly see that the toes are aligned like in the 3rd pic with the big toe on the right foot even pointing straighter forward. That's amazing and I never thought that it would have such a positive effect in such little time. There's lots of work needed on my left big toe though. When flexing the toe the direction in the joint is way more off than on the other one.


I'll continue to wear the Five Fingers in all day situations and for walks, but I'll continue to run in my running shoes with orthodics and will also wear shoes with orthodics. Maybe I'll get some classics for when I'm home since I guess that they're easier to slip in. I don't have any problems getting my feet into the KSOs though.

I don't care if it's impossible to correct the bunions fully, I just wanna do something and don't see the need to undergo an operation (yet).


I'll post some picture of the effect that the Vibrams in combination with the Hallufix splints have on my feet in a couple of weeks or months.
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tlau
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« Reply #50 on: July 11, 2010, 02:15:12 PM »

Like Hallufox, I've also had bunions all my life and thought they were normal.  My feet look almost exactly the same as the photos he/she posted.  It was a given ever since I was little that I'd have to have foot surgery someday to correct them.

What I'm wondering is how long I need to go barefoot, to correct for a lifetime of wearing shoes.

I've been wearing only VFF's or Vivo Barefoots since February this year (about 6 months).  I wear them to work, I run about 4-6 miles per week.  At home or around the yard I go barefoot as much as possible.  I have also begun to go trail hiking in VFF's.

Unfortunately I haven't seen much effect on my big toe alignment.  I still have pain under the ball of my right foot, and the pad under my big toe still gets extremely sensitive to the touch.  It's the worst right after I wake up.  When I'm relaxing at home I will often try to stretch out the big toe and pull it manually back into alignment; the ball joint will crackle and snap, and it will feel better temporarily (but return to the "normal" shape, with the big toe pointing outward, as soon as I let go).  The tendons along my big toe are often sore, both under and above the toe.

I've been at it for 6 months now and I'm not giving up yet.  I definitely have better balance and posture.  I enjoy increased connection with the earth, and I stand up straighter when my feet are solidly in contact with the ground.  But I'm disappointed that I haven't seen more improvement in my bunions.
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Hallufox
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« Reply #51 on: July 12, 2010, 03:40:38 PM »

Like Hallufox, I've also had bunions all my life and thought they were normal.  My feet look almost exactly the same as the photos he/she posted.  It was a given ever since I was little that I'd have to have foot surgery someday to correct them.

What I'm wondering is how long I need to go barefoot, to correct for a lifetime of wearing shoes.

I've been wearing only VFF's or Vivo Barefoots since February this year (about 6 months).  I wear them to work, I run about 4-6 miles per week.  At home or around the yard I go barefoot as much as possible.  I have also begun to go trail hiking in VFF's.

Unfortunately I haven't seen much effect on my big toe alignment.  I still have pain under the ball of my right foot, and the pad under my big toe still gets extremely sensitive to the touch.  It's the worst right after I wake up.  When I'm relaxing at home I will often try to stretch out the big toe and pull it manually back into alignment; the ball joint will crackle and snap, and it will feel better temporarily (but return to the "normal" shape, with the big toe pointing outward, as soon as I let go).  The tendons along my big toe are often sore, both under and above the toe.

I've been at it for 6 months now and I'm not giving up yet.  I definitely have better balance and posture.  I enjoy increased connection with the earth, and I stand up straighter when my feet are solidly in contact with the ground.  But I'm disappointed that I haven't seen more improvement in my bunions.


It's bummer that you can't see much of an effect after 6 months, but if there's some positive effect then it's definitely worth switching to V5Fs.

I'm pretty happy that I hardly have any pain in my big toe joints.

I think wearing the V5F is better than walking barefoot when it comes to bunions. When walking barefoot the muscles in the feet may get stronger, but there's nothing to hold the toe in place/allignment. Plus I'm not sure about the effect on flat and splay feet.

Therefore I'll continue to wear normal shoes and running shoes with my orthodics (in order to keep the arch up and and do something about the splayfeet), I'll wear Five Fingers as often as possible (in order to strengthen the feet and allign the toes)
and I'll walk barefoot at home and will do foot gymnastics (in order to strengthen the feet) and wear the Hallufix bunion splints in the night. During the last few days I woke up after appr. 4 hours due to pain in the toe joints or close to the toe joints. It's a pretty strange feeling. Maybe those are the tendons which are 'moving'?

Before I ran into Vibram Five Fingers I was thinking about getting Japanese tabi shoes. Something like this:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320413504423&var=510000065829&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

or
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320541945923&var=510005708451&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

Those may be options for the winter. There are also tabi boots with steel caps for protection. Those may be an option for work.


I won't switch to running in V5F yet since I know that I'lll definitely need more time to get used to them and I have no problem running with my normal running shoes. Used to have some knee problems, but changed the way I run and am doing it much smoother now and didn't had any pain since then. Maybe I'll try some Bikilas and start doing a few short runs in the end of summer.
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HugoStazz
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« Reply #52 on: October 29, 2010, 12:43:48 PM »

Have anybody tried correcting bunions, big toe inflare or "overall toe alignment"  with gel toe separators between toes.
http://www2.mooremedical.com/index.cfm?PG=CTL&CS=HOM&FN=ProductDetail&PID=15257

I was thinking putting Gel pad to each toe space. And if possible wear gel toe separators inside shoes.
This way muscular and joint reconstruct could be done and overall movement still should be possible.
You could adjust the height of the Gel separators by cutting the height, maybe  a little.

What do you think?
Anybody have already experience of this?



 
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Hallufox
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« Reply #53 on: November 02, 2010, 01:15:31 PM »


What do you think?
Anybody have already experience of this?


I also looked into toe-spreaders/separators like these, but then I wasn't sure if these would help in straightening the big toe or if they'd just help crooking the other toes.  Wink

Therefore I think it's better to get the Hallufix splint and wear these in wide shoes.

http://www.hallufix.org/english/index.html

I'm wearing them every night and may wear them in one pair of my shoes soon.
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HugoStazz
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« Reply #54 on: November 04, 2010, 02:52:37 PM »

I discussed with a physiotherapist abaut the subject. She was saying that  metatarsal pad would do the new alignment for big toe. 

Metatarsal pad
http://www.yoursorefeet.com/Metatarsal-Pad-Pair-CornsCallusesForefoot.html
http://www.compohio.net/eBay/Tacco/607a.JPG

Metatarsal dome
http://www.footsmart.com/images/images/amazon/10027.main.jpg

I was thinking of wearing pad and strap for big toe alignment.
strap: http://shop.opcpl.com.au/opcshoponline/images/products/FOS47_t.jpg

What do you think, comments?
Any experience of pads?
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Hallufox
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« Reply #55 on: January 07, 2011, 05:32:19 PM »

I discussed with a physiotherapist abaut the subject. She was saying that  metatarsal pad would do the new alignment for big toe. 

Metatarsal pad
http://www.yoursorefeet.com/Metatarsal-Pad-Pair-CornsCallusesForefoot.html
http://www.compohio.net/eBay/Tacco/607a.JPG
g[/url]

What do you think, comments?
Any experience of pads?



The Hallufix splint includes a metatarsal pad/pelotte which can be attached on the strap that's around the foot with velcro.

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HugoStazz
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« Reply #56 on: January 25, 2011, 07:24:50 AM »

Hallufox have you used the splint?
Interesting that there is the metatarsal pad included now.
What is your feeling abaut the product?

Does the splint fit into Fivefingers?

I have used  gel toe separators and my shoe size have gone 2-3 sizes up.
Really difficult to find minimalistic shoes with elastic sole  and wide toebox.
I ordered Vivo Barefoot Neo -shoes. Now waiting those, hope they will be great out from the box.
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Zephyr
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« Reply #57 on: January 27, 2011, 12:31:20 AM »

I think that the Vibram FiveFingers should encourage a wider separation between the 1st and 2nd digits. Their shape doesn't resemble to the feet of those who has been bare foot all their lives, but rather it is much closer to a regular all-life shod Westerner foot.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2011, 12:46:29 AM by Zephyr » Logged
Hallufox
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« Reply #58 on: January 30, 2011, 02:20:49 PM »

Hallufox have you used the splint?
Interesting that there is the metatarsal pad included now.
What is your feeling abaut the product?

Does the splint fit into Fivefingers?

I have used  gel toe separators and my shoe size have gone 2-3 sizes up.
Really difficult to find minimalistic shoes with elastic sole  and wide toebox.
I ordered Vivo Barefoot Neo -shoes. Now waiting those, hope they will be great out from the box.


There's no way I could get the splint in a Vibram five fingers. I just wear the splints during the night, but I also tried them in my sneakers. It took a while till I was able to walk with the splints on my feet. On the left foot I can't attach the toe too tight to the splint, coz then I have trouble being able to flex the toe.

About the splints and the VFF, IMO there's no need to put the splints in there since the VFF already seperate your toes.

Anyway, I think the Hallufix splints are excellent for those whose bunions and position of the big toe are getting worse. In my case I'm not sure if it'll get worse since I had those bunions for like forever. I think wearing the splints in the night must be some kind of relief to the toes though.

Maybe itt's a good idea to put Metatarsal pads in the Five fingers.
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« Reply #59 on: February 01, 2011, 12:26:04 AM »

Wow what an entertaining thread!  Smiley  I am intrigued by this splint.  I just posted about some odd foot pains I was having and reading all of this made me remember....duh I have a huge bunion on that foot with the odd foot pains!  I've been in the VFFs now for over 6 months and I am half wondering if perhaps these odd footpains are GOOD?  Perhaps my foot is actually realigning?  I've been tempted to see a dr but I worry they will only tell me to quit running or wear more supportive shoes.  Not to mention it's hard to come by a decent dr where I live. 

So...those of you who have noticed bunion improvements with the VFFs...did you notice any odd foot pains to go along with it?  It's all along the inside of my foot, triggered by pointing down my foot hard or gently squeezing the midfoot together.  I can't palpate an actual sore point anywhere though.
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