BirthdayShoes.com Vibram Five Fingers Forum
October 22, 2014, 06:21:53 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  

Tired of seeing ads? Simply become a forum member and login (membership is free!).

nanny-rosy
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Need help with Sole Repair...  (Read 1998 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Mr Blue
Newbie
*

Reputation: 1
Mr Blue is a new face.
Posts: 9


View Profile
« on: May 03, 2012, 10:03:02 PM »

After 7 months of wearing my KSO, (mostly travelling, walking and jogging), the is a hole developed in the right one.

It is a small one, but I want to fix it before it gets bigger and render the whole shoes unwearable.
I managed to find this guide : http://birthdayshoes.com/vibram-five-fingers-sole-repair-using-shoe-goo. Problem is it seems I can't find a Shoe Goo here.
(I am staying at Taiwan now and the only tools I have is some needles, a tube of superglue which can actually melt the fabric of the KSO   Shocked, haven't try it on the rubber though).
Is there any alternate way I can use to fix it?  Cry
Logged
BirthdayShoes.com Vibram Five Fingers Forum
« on: May 03, 2012, 10:03:02 PM »

 Logged
rookhoe
Full Member
***

Reputation: 2
rookhoe is a new face.
Posts: 117



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2012, 11:10:49 PM »

Ehhhhh, ive never had to repair any VFF's before. But something that just came to mind was possibly the bike tire repair kits that come with the patches that you just glue over the hole. Im sure there could possibly be better ways of fixing it though.
Logged

Furthest distance in VFF: 12 miles
Furthest distance in NB Zero Trail: 12 miles
VFF: KSO M43, Bikila LS M43
Non VFF: NB Minimus Zero Trail
Mr Blue
Newbie
*

Reputation: 1
Mr Blue is a new face.
Posts: 9


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2012, 01:18:36 AM »

Ehhhhh, ive never had to repair any VFF's before. But something that just came to mind was possibly the bike tire repair kits that come with the patches that you just glue over the hole. Im sure there could possibly be better ways of fixing it though.

I'm thinking finding a piece of thin rubber and just superglue it to the hole, not sure what will happen if the rubber reacts to the adhesive though.  Huh
Logged
nowster
Hero Member
*****

Reputation: 7
nowster is starting to look familiar.nowster is starting to look familiar.
Posts: 637


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2012, 06:46:44 AM »

Have you tried contact adhesive (rubber based)? In the UK the best known brand of that is EvoStik.
Logged

VFF: M46: Classic, KSO x4, Trek x3, Trek LS, Treksport x2, KMDSport, EL-X, Bikila LS, Spyridon MR, Flow, Signa, Speed, Sprint (fake?), KSO EVO;
       M47: Speed, Classic (too big)
Non-VFF: 46 Merrell Tough Glove, 47 VB Synth Hiker
BirthdayShoes.com Vibram Five Fingers Forum
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2012, 06:46:44 AM »

 Logged
Mr Blue
Newbie
*

Reputation: 1
Mr Blue is a new face.
Posts: 9


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2012, 09:09:04 AM »

Have you tried contact adhesive (rubber based)? In the UK the best known brand of that is EvoStik.

Haven't tried it, thought it might damage the fabric.

Come to think of it, how does adhesive fix the hole? Does it create a layer to cover it?  Huh
Logged
Mr. Leigh
Superstar
******

Reputation: 23
Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.
Posts: 2027


23 pair VFFs, 3 pair Stems, 5 VB, & 2 Teva


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2012, 09:55:06 AM »

You could adhere something to the shoe (bike tire patch) so that whatever is adhered is what wears instead of the sole of the actual shoe or you could just build up the sole with the rubberized adhesive and then replace it as necessary when it wears down.  It all depends on how clean you want it to look when you are done and how much maintenance you want to have to keep it up.
Logged

So be sure when you step.
Step with care and great tact and remember that Life's a Great Balancing Act.
Just never forget to be dexterous and deft. 
And never mix up your right foot and your left.

Oh, the Places You'll Go! by Dr. Suess
LillyBeth
Newbie
*

Reputation: 1
LillyBeth is a new face.
Posts: 7


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2013, 06:07:03 AM »

Sorry, I know this is an old post but thought I could help...

I've had a similar problem with holes developing on the soles of my Spyridons due to being used a lot on roads, and from the research I've done I tried Shoe Goo. This was after trying Plasti-Dip and epoxy glue with limited success. Shoe Goo is designed for shoe repairs so no wonder I've found it the best so far, although it would need to be reapplied occasionally. With a warn patch like on your shoes I just applied a thin layer, but on the parts where the heels had really worn down on one side I used a different approach as I needed it thicker; I put a line of SG on a piece of parchment (grease-proof) paper, waited for it to dry then peeled it off and cut to the required size. So what I then had was a 2-3mm thick patch that I could then stick to the soles with the SG, and so far it's looking good  Smiley
Logged

Owner of Spyridons and Treksports, and expect to build quite a collection over time if I'm not careful!
jlscnsdn
Newbie
*

Reputation: 1
jlscnsdn is a new face.
Posts: 10


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2013, 11:27:06 AM »

5-9 months is the lifespan I expect out of VFF's, depending on terrain. But, I like to maximize my investment.

Prep the area with a light scrub using an old toothbrush and either rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer. Allow to dry. Stuff the inside of the toe being patched to simulate the fill of a toe; I used rolled toilet paper inside of some packaging plastic (so that the epoxy wouldn't stick to it).

Cut a small patch of nylon canvas (or whatever you have - I use some from the patch-panel in old USGI duffel bags) to fit. Apply a thin layer of Freesole or Shoegoo (both will remain flexible after curing, unlike many adhesives)to the area around the hole, with at least 1/4" to either direction. Impress the water repellant-treated side of the patch into the epoy, smoothing out bubbles and bulges. Allow to cure until no longer tacky and sturdy; then apply with a finger and additional layer of epoxy across the entire surface of the patch and overlapping the edges by about 3/16" or so. Maritime epoxy isn't a bad substitute if easier to find, and is easier then ShoeGoo to apply in a thin\consistent layer.

I've patched two KSO pairs, a Bikila pair, and two Bikila LS pairs in this manner.
Logged
Mr. Leigh
Superstar
******

Reputation: 23
Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.Mr. Leigh thinks they know everything about birthday shoes.
Posts: 2027


23 pair VFFs, 3 pair Stems, 5 VB, & 2 Teva


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2013, 11:11:23 AM »

5-9 months is the lifespan I expect out of VFF's, depending on terrain. But, I like to maximize my investment.

Prep the area with a light scrub using an old toothbrush and either rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer. Allow to dry. Stuff the inside of the toe being patched to simulate the fill of a toe; I used rolled toilet paper inside of some packaging plastic (so that the epoxy wouldn't stick to it).

Cut a small patch of nylon canvas (or whatever you have - I use some from the patch-panel in old USGI duffel bags) to fit. Apply a thin layer of Freesole or Shoegoo (both will remain flexible after curing, unlike many adhesives)to the area around the hole, with at least 1/4" to either direction. Impress the water repellant-treated side of the patch into the epoy, smoothing out bubbles and bulges. Allow to cure until no longer tacky and sturdy; then apply with a finger and additional layer of epoxy across the entire surface of the patch and overlapping the edges by about 3/16" or so. Maritime epoxy isn't a bad substitute if easier to find, and is easier then ShoeGoo to apply in a thin\consistent layer.

I've patched two KSO pairs, a Bikila pair, and two Bikila LS pairs in this manner.

Pictures please.
Logged

So be sure when you step.
Step with care and great tact and remember that Life's a Great Balancing Act.
Just never forget to be dexterous and deft. 
And never mix up your right foot and your left.

Oh, the Places You'll Go! by Dr. Suess
jlscnsdn
Newbie
*

Reputation: 1
jlscnsdn is a new face.
Posts: 10


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2013, 05:18:23 AM »

I'll check to see what other pictures I have, when I get back home; I lost a bunch to phonewipe.

The Bikilas on the flanks ended up wearing through and being patched similarly, but less symmetrically; and ended up as gifts.

The KSO's in the center are patched with 1250 denier Cordura nylon canvas (military issue duffel bag fabric) and two layers of marine epoxy; these'd be my second pair of KSO's\first pair patched. The green spot in the middle of the white epoxy is the canvas becoming visible after a bunch of miles scuffed off the epoxy. Most likely after the first 6 or 12 miles.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!