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nanny-rosy
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 51 
 on: September 21, 2015, 03:52:15 PM 
Started by huaraz - Last post by huaraz
Unfortunately I'm finding less barefoot/minimalist options for kids. I liked the Merrell's Glove collection but I'm not fining them anyone. It appears to be discontinued.  New Balance Minimus also disappeared. What is going on? Didn't they sell well enough with people not appreciating the benefits they offer for growing feet. I have to admit they were expensive. Now what? With the two mainstream shoe makers out, that leaves VFF and Vivo. My kids have been in Payless Champion shoes - cheap minimalist option.

 52 
 on: September 21, 2015, 11:05:58 AM 
Started by Draco - Last post by Draco
I will need todo that is i have an employer that requires steel toe boots, i did one time have an employer that did let me wear steel toe guards external to the shoe only when i needed then for safty reasons, like cutting down small trees with a weed eater affixed with a steel blade, one problem i have always had with boots is ventilation, one place i worked at i wore running shoes that are just mesh, the other coworkers made fun of me and not being hygienic until i took one off and showed the breathable mesh, no sweat no mess, plus a removable foot bed.

I am in mid Michigan my self and in the winter can be a challenge to be comfortable, the clogs have enough hieght that slush and thin show are not a problem, but -20f snow does tend to sting a bit so then come out the socks or hiking shoes

 53 
 on: September 21, 2015, 07:51:26 AM 
Started by Sinocelt - Last post by Sinocelt
Since I started this thread, I owe "everyone" at least a short update.

I tried training barefoot on the uneven concrete floor. It sorta worked out, with some caveats.
  • I was slower and clumsier, less fluid, when training on the Corbag, though I got better toward the end (I started with 40 instead of 60 minutes).
  • I couldn't properly execute exercises like the fencing lunge or the lunge switch, both of which require that you stay very close to the floor.
  • I couldn't do a proper long jump, for fear of slipping and hurting myself.
  • I'm afraid high-impact exercises, such as squat jumps with dumbbells, may hurt the ligaments, after a while. But I can just use my thick yoga mat for those; strictly vertical jumps won't make it slip.
  • I walked on the tip of a structural wire that pierced the concrete. Whoever made that floor really did a botched job.
  • The concrete kept my feet cool even though the rest of my body was hot from moving around. Comes winter, I don't know if I'll be able to train barefoot at all.

In addition, I'd like to mention the Feiyue shoes. They're zero-drop shoes with thick, grippy soles, designed in China for martial arts, and very cheap (in New York and Taipei, at least). I considered using them as throwaway shoes, but they do have a problem: a small toe box. My little toe ends rubbing a hole through the canvas (a problem I had with other shoes, too). That shows how much pressure the toes are subjected to by the shoe.


[Edit:] I hadn't seen there was a second page to this thread already, and missed two answers. Sorry. So ...

Ah, but I already have stall slabs. They don't stay put.

You wouldn't move mine..  They are close to 85lbs each.  I can't slide them to adjust them on a smooth wood floor when fully unrolled.

Ah. I haven't weighted mine, but they sure aren't that heavy. They're 50x50-cm hard slabs (that can't be rolled) my sister originally bought for one of her horses.

If you master levitation, let us know... Cool

I have! I can stay about 5 cm from the floor, now, for about one second. My friends insist on calling that "jumping, and pitifully low, too," but they're all imaginary, so what do they know?


Given everything you're saying, perhaps the problem is not with your shoes but more with your choice of practice area?

That's not really a choice. That's all I have available.  Undecided

 54 
 on: September 17, 2015, 06:22:39 PM 
Started by Draco - Last post by barefootin
I also have a pair of steel toe work boots that were modified by a cobbler if I really need .  The inner sole, outer sole and shank were removed and the sole replaced with a VIBRAM 6.5mm sole.  They are water proof, zero drop, and quite flexible... 

I've heard about getting boots modified like this, and its definitely something I'd consider, since I can't seem to find any weatherproof boots without a stiff sole and heel. What would one need to look for so that the sole could be removed and the conversion to zero drop would work well?

Typically it needs to be a boot that has a sewn on welt and sole, not one that is bonded.  They are out there in the higher quality brands.  If you find a pair, next check is removing the insole and looking at what is under it...  Some now have the heel area carved out for "comfort" sole area and will not work for the conversion.  I'd talk to your perspective cobbler first and look through the catalog of available soles..  I guarantee he will be reluctant and will not understand why you want the cushion or shank removed...  Here are mine, I forgot to mention they have composite metatarsal protection (I Met) and composite steel toe also..

 55 
 on: September 17, 2015, 01:45:07 PM 
Started by Draco - Last post by Horse Rider
I wear the Vivobarefoot Boxing Boot and their Off Road Hi, as well as Bikila Evo WP for running.

 56 
 on: September 17, 2015, 03:24:27 AM 
Started by Zig - Last post by nowster
The "I'd also..." wording was meant as "In addition to what others have said above..."

I hadn't realised the Vybrid had arch support. One to avoid, then!

 57 
 on: September 17, 2015, 02:19:02 AM 
Started by nazgulnarsil - Last post by Zig

So I got the cheap teslas from amazon and after taking out the insoles GREAT SUCCESS! flat bottom and flexible upper that lets my foot spread. It would be nice if they were a tiny bit wider but these are by FAR the closest thing yet.


Interesting, is this the one: http://www.amazon.com/Tesla-Minimalist-Barefoot-Athletic-BareTrek/dp/B00VQ07ZGA

I am surprised that the Merrell Glove line are considered barefoot style shoes when they have a very noticeable medial post. Unlike the VFF shank that flexes with the foot, the bump in all the Merrell Gloves I tried on felt rigid.

 58 
 on: September 17, 2015, 02:10:15 AM 
Started by dirkverelst - Last post by Zig
Last month I was walking by the beach and a group of people started pointing at my KSOs yelling at me "WHAT ARE THOOOOOOOOOOOOSE!? repeatedly. Soon found out its just an internet meme catchphrase from a viral video.

 59 
 on: September 17, 2015, 02:02:06 AM 
Started by Draco - Last post by Zig
I also have a pair of steel toe work boots that were modified by a cobbler if I really need .  The inner sole, outer sole and shank were removed and the sole replaced with a VIBRAM 6.5mm sole.  They are water proof, zero drop, and quite flexible... 

I've heard about getting boots modified like this, and its definitely something I'd consider, since I can't seem to find any weatherproof boots without a stiff sole and heel. What would one need to look for so that the sole could be removed and the conversion to zero drop would work well?

 60 
 on: September 17, 2015, 01:55:12 AM 
Started by Zig - Last post by Zig
Update: Later yesterday and today I walked around in my Lems again for a short while, and felt pretty good. The soreness in the bony area inner side of my left foot was more noticeable while walking, but less as bothersome as when I last wore them about 10 days prior. The area feels more comfortable in Sanuks (ordered the shoe version for more stability than the slip-on) and the discomfort is hardly noticeable in chucks, so I've been alternating between the three, and possibly a VFF now.

I'd also suggest you take a look at your walking gait. You shouldn't really be landing toes first, but flatter, possibly even with the heel contacting the ground a fraction before the rest of the foot. Not landing on the heel like when you overstride, but keeping balance within the foot and a slight bend in the knee. The temptation is to go from one extreme to the other.

What you describe seems to be how I walk, lighter heel contact slightly before the forefoot contacts and then the knee bends. When the injury was at its worst, it was after walking a few hours on concrete and hard dirt, which are the majority of terrain I have access to. You began with "I'd also," was there another part of your post that got left out?

Some of the newer Vibram styles, eg. the Vybrid, have a more padded sole. An alternative would be to add a flat insole into your existing shoes.

VFF website said the Vybrid has added arch support. However, I just dug out and cleaned off my Spyridon LS, which are much thicker than the others. They fit tighter than my KSO and Bikila in the same size, probably why I stopped wearing them before, and I even went up a size in VFF since, and didn't replace these yet. I'll probably walk in them later this week and think about replacing them with the new version in my current size.

The Lems don't have much space between the sole and upper, so I don't think a thicker sole would work well with it. I've been wearing Lems since January, usually with the insole it comes with for a better fit.

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