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nanny-rosy
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Author Topic: correct running style  (Read 930 times)
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cawkazn
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« on: March 16, 2012, 01:38:48 AM »

so i got some bikilias (size 43, 10 1/2" foot, feel a bit tight, think I shoulda got 44's)

anyways I have been running in these shoes. I upped it from 1 mile once a week, to 1 mile twice a week. my calves are pretty damn sore.

I was previously running 4 miles 5 days a week.

I am wondering if my calves are so sore because I am not running correctly?

I have been running purely on the balls of my feet, and I dont let my heel touch the ground, or sometimes very slightly. is this correct? I know that you are not supposed to run heel toe.

so my question is when I run, should it be more like toe/heel at the same time, rather then just toe?
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« on: March 16, 2012, 01:38:48 AM »

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Go_Blue
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2012, 11:38:54 AM »

First of all, from personal experience, I found the best way to learn is to take your shoes off completely and run barefoot on a firm surface, ie. smooth concrete.  Only go as far as your bare skin will allow.  Your feet and skin WILL tell you how best to run.  I struggeld for MONTHS in Vibrams before finally just going barefoot, and my running immediately began to improve.  It is safe.

Your calves are sore largely because you're trying too hard with a forefoot strike.  You shouldn't try to keep your heel from touching.  Holding your heel off the ground and running on your toes like that all the time will overload your calves and achilles.  People strike slightly differently, but generally speaking a midfoot strike is very effective.  You land in the middle of your foot, and your heel "kisses" the ground second.  To the observer, it may look like the runner is landing flat footed, but in fact the front/middle of the foot does land first before the heel.  Once the heel hits the ground, the arch may spread out and absorb/transfer a lot of that shock.

Quick cadence (ie. 180bpm), land under your center of gravity, LIFT your feet instead of pushing off your toes, keep your knees bent, and don't force your heel to stay in the air.  Heel should have secondary contact with the ground.  That's my experience.
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JustinB
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 11:56:20 AM »

I would check out this post and look at the video included.

http://birthdayshoes.com/forum/vff-or-barefoot-running/how-to-forefoot-strike/

You can see that he is landing almost simultaneously.  If you are running totally on the balls of your feet your are overexerting your calves.  In either case, during your transition your calves are going to be extremely sore because you are using them more than previously. I would not start at 1 mile.  In the beginning I would be more in the area of 1/4 mile and slowly work your way up adding a 1/4 a week.
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acc
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 12:28:29 PM »

I feel when forefoot striking, if you touch your heel to the ground, there isn't enough turnover. If you midfoot then maybe.

Look at the prosthetics to see what I mean: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Flickr_-_The_U.S._Army_-_U.S._Army_World_Class_Athlete_Program_Paralympic.jpg
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 12:28:29 PM »

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PB Junkie
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2012, 12:44:09 PM »

Interesting, ACC.  I initially land on my forefoot and then my heel does lightly touch the ground.  I've been checking my cadence lately and I am at 180 or more. I would say natural running is slightly different for everyone.

I feel when forefoot striking, if you touch your heel to the ground, there isn't enough turnover. If you midfoot then maybe.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 12:47:14 PM by PB Junkie » Logged

VFFs: KSO W40, Treksport W40, Bikila W40, Jaya LR W41, Komodosport LS W40, KSO Trek W40, Spyridon LS W40, Bikila LS W40
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2012, 01:15:16 PM »

Interesting, ACC.  I initially land on my forefoot and then my heel does lightly touch the ground.  I've been checking my cadence lately and I am at 180 or more. I would say natural running is slightly different for everyone.

I'm on board with that. Some people like to specify a certain running style like Pose Method, Chi, Evolution, etc. However, the majority of people probably running in minimalist shoes fall into a generic "natural" or "barefoot" style. This normally involves a light heel touch down. As long as you're not getting hurt and it works for you I would not worry about it too much. Now, if you ask about a specific running style then that changes the conversation.
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acc
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« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2012, 08:41:25 PM »

Of course, it could just be that my heel touches ever so slightly that I don't even notice it. But when going fully bare, I don't think I ever slam my heel because it simply hurts my plantar fascia. I haven't ventured to the extreme of putting paint on my heel to determine this though.

A good example of what I mean is if you walk up steps. I don't think anyone slams their heel on steps.

It really depends on pace. I shifted to almost always high intensity interval. If I touch my heel to the ground hard, it sends a shock up my heel and I will feel it.

Barefoot Ken Bob says there's a "myth of no heel touch"... so it could be I just don't record myself. People practicing POSE say that if you don't touch your heel you could blow out your calves/achilles or get a shin splint. I've not gotten any of these so I guess I might touch my heel without noticing it?

I am no means an expert on form so don't take my observations too seriously. Regardless, I wouldn't try to force anything on yourself if something is painful when doing it. Tongue

edit: I found this: http://barefootjason.blogspot.com/2010/08/common-question-should-my-heel-touch.html
Quote
Simply put, your heel should always softly touch the ground with each step. The exception to this rule is running fast.  As speed increases, there will be a slight natural forward shift in weight that keeps the heel off the ground.  The Pose method of running explains this phenomenon especially well.  


and
Quote
Now you're ready to assume the Running Pose. Let's put it all together. Stand in place with the ball of one foot on the ground. The heel of that foot is barely off the ground and may even lightly contact the ground. Your body has assumed the S-like shape and your leg and trunk muscles are lightly tense. Your non-support leg is barely off the ground, bent only slightly more than the support leg.

 -     Nicholas Romanov. Dr. Nicholas Romanov's Pose Method of Running. PoseTech, Coral Gables, FL, USA. 2002

« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 08:51:36 PM by acc » Logged

Looking for sale /coupons at VFF/Injinji stores (authorized dealers only) Waiting for 3mm soled leather VFF oxford (not Capri) and KSO EVO.
cawkazn
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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2012, 10:21:19 PM »

First of all, from personal experience, I found the best way to learn is to take your shoes off completely and run barefoot on a firm surface, ie. smooth concrete.  Only go as far as your bare skin will allow.  Your feet and skin WILL tell you how best to run.  I struggeld for MONTHS in Vibrams before finally just going barefoot, and my running immediately began to improve.  It is safe.

Your calves are sore largely because you're trying too hard with a forefoot strike.  You shouldn't try to keep your heel from touching.  Holding your heel off the ground and running on your toes like that all the time will overload your calves and achilles.  People strike slightly differently, but generally speaking a midfoot strike is very effective.  You land in the middle of your foot, and your heel "kisses" the ground second.  To the observer, it may look like the runner is landing flat footed, but in fact the front/middle of the foot does land first before the heel.  Once the heel hits the ground, the arch may spread out and absorb/transfer a lot of that shock.

Quick cadence (ie. 180bpm), land under your center of gravity, LIFT your feet instead of pushing off your toes, keep your knees bent, and don't force your heel to stay in the air.  Heel should have secondary contact with the ground.  That's my experience.

you and the post below yours hit the nail on the head i believe.
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paulr
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2012, 09:47:59 AM »

I would check out this post and look at the video included.

http://birthdayshoes.com/forum/vff-or-barefoot-running/how-to-forefoot-strike/

You can see that he is landing almost simultaneously.  If you are running totally on the balls of your feet your are overexerting your calves.  In either case, during your transition your calves are going to be extremely sore because you are using them more than previously. I would not start at 1 mile.  In the beginning I would be more in the area of 1/4 mile and slowly work your way up adding a 1/4 a week.


The foot landing technique of the guy in the video is quite brilliant (to the uneducated me that is) - definitely one to strive for I think

I wonder if anyone has any tips to someone starting out, to try to achieve something like a semi-reasonable barefoot style foot strike ?  Im considering attempting to try to get some sort of barefoot technique but still in my conventional running shoes (Im about 8 weeks away from geting VFFs) - is this ok to do or dumb ?
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Jeepman
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2012, 11:39:16 AM »

I wonder if anyone has any tips to someone starting out, to try to achieve something like a semi-reasonable barefoot style foot strike ?  Im considering attempting to try to get some sort of barefoot technique but still in my conventional running shoes (Im about 8 weeks away from geting VFFs) - is this ok to do or dumb ?

Trying to do that in conventional running shoes will make it unnecessarily difficult. You really need a lighter weight shoe with no more than about 4mm difference in heel to forefoot thickness. A couple years back I tried to run in my old Acsics GT-2130 shoes just for giggles. I got out about quarter mile and said screw this. I took them off and jogged back home barefoot with a smile on my face.
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2012, 07:45:09 PM »

still transitioning into the barefoot running style i a still trying to narrow down my correct technique. the one re-occurring pain i keep getting is significant tightness and soreness in the arch on, usually, my left foot. this happens anywhere between 1/2 a mile or a mile. if i rest for a bit i can go back out and do the same distance and the pain in my arch comes back. i have not narrowed down why this is happening, but have noticed when i land much more flat footed, and touch my heel down slightly after each mid foot strike i can usually go farther before the annoying arch pain came back. i also noticed that one time when the arch soreness set in if i landed more on the outside of my left foot and roll in it subsides the pain for a little while. Im not sure how much that last bit helped, might have been a one time thing. (this has been in my ksos)

any ideas?
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