Meet Lems Boulder, the "Barefoot Shoe" Boot

Meet Lems Boulder, the "Barefoot Shoe" Boot

I got good news from Andrew Rademacher, founder of upstart minimalist/barefoot shoe manufacturer Lems Shoes* ("Light. Easy. Minimal.") — the first batch of the much-anticipated Lems Shoes Boulder Boot are now available for order! I say "first batch" because it's only the first few hundred pairs of production (more to come, of course, within a few weeks).

The release of the Boulder boot marks the first of a new line of Lems hitting the market in 2013! What's so exciting about the Boulder? Aside from it being a "barefoot shoe boot" that is super lightweight, zero drop, minimally and flexibly soled, and a boot, well, what else is there to say? If you've had a pair of Andrew's barefoot shoes, you're expectations are likely through the roof for these boots. We've reviewed the first offering from Lems that hit back in 2011 — the Primal (see reviews here and here) and had nothing but good things to say.

Andrew has a pair of Boulders coming my way, so I hope to share more about it soon, but if you're eager to snatch up a pair without further adieu and want to know the scoop, read on!

UPDATE: I got the boots! If you want to jump straight to my full review of the Lems Boulder boot, go here!


The official Boulder Boot specs from Lems!

Read the rest of this post »

Latest Vibram Five Fingers Reviews 1/17/10

Bit of a delay in posting last week's latest reviews — I was out of town.

  • FiveFingers After Six Months at Not Buff, Not Brilliant [KSO]:

    Third -- they are still useful for other applications. I wear these for Krav Maga classes and other conditioning classes that I do. For that, these are perfect. They are very light, and they teach you in a very painful way how to do a proper front kick to the bladder. If you've done it wrong, there is no padding to protect your toes from being broken or strained.

  • Vibram Five Fingers KSO Trek Review at BirthdayShoes [KSO Trek]:

    I think the FiveFingers KSO Trek will have a permanent place in the Vibram line-up due to its impressive combination of design, performance, materials, and aesthetic — all while maintaining a minimalist form-factor (The KSO Treks weigh in at under 6 oz/each "shoe" and under 12 oz total). I find myself wearing my Treks frequently nowadays for just bumming around.

    This is the my "official" KSO Trek review!

Go here for last week's latest Five Fingers reviews!

Photos of Bikila and Speed sales models (Pre-production versions)

05.06.10 - The Vibram Five Fingers Bikila is out!

A day or two back, a facebook photo from a FiveFingers fan in Finland surfaced that appeared to be showing off the upcoming and yet-to-be released-but-eagerly-anticipated, running-shoe specific Five Fingers Bikila (Here's the photo of Ville's Bikila-clad feet). Wendy alerted me to the photo and I got in touch with Ville. Gotta love cross-country collaboration amongst VFF fans!

So Ville graciously gave me the scoop. Seems that he has a good friend in the VFF business and was able to secure a pre-production sales sample of the Bikila. In other words, more a prototype to show off the concept than the final model (Used, apparently, for stuff like this or as likely used by Henk Sipers). The tell-tale giveaway was that the insole of the Bikilas wasn't attached — removable to demo construction (The final version will be seamlessly attached as is the case with all VFFs).

That's enough backstory. Here are the photos Ville sent me:

A few photos from Ville in Finland who is getting to test-drive a pre-production version (sales sample) of the upcoming FiveFingers Bikila.  Note: this isn't the final version which will be released in the Spring.
A few photos from Ville in Finland who is getting to test-drive a pre-production version (sales sample) of the upcoming FiveFingers Bikila. Note: this isn't the final version which will be released in the Spring.

It's very exciting to see an in-the-flesh version of the Bikila, even if it's still not the final one, which I'm betting will be even more slick. It's further great to get another look at that sole, which looks both minimal and high-tech at the same time (Note the use of EVA to cover the arch in lieu of Vibram rubber).

Ville provided a few insights to the photos. The upper is a stretchy material and seems not to have any seams. With seam-rubbing being one of the most oft-cited issues for runners in VFFs, this could be a major plus for the Bikila. Ville also confirmed the reflective material on heel and strap.

I need to reiterate that this is a sales sample and not the final product, so there could and likely will be some changes to the final version we see in March. And yep, March is looking just about right for the roll-out of the Bikila as Vibram recently hired an ad agency to aid in the promotion of a product for a March release.

But that's not all. As coincidence would have it, I also got a few photos from Dastin in Germany who got his feet into, again, what appears to be one of the sales samples of the Euro-only FiveFingers Speed. Check'em out:

Dastin in Germany got his feet into what appears to also be a pre-production sales sample of the Euro-only FiveFingers Speed.  The final version has not yet been officially released (as far as we know).
Dastin in Germany got his feet into what appears to also be a pre-production sales sample of the Euro-only FiveFingers Speed. The final version has not yet been officially released (as far as we know).

Again, the "tell" that these weren't production releases was in the ability to remove the insoles — a feature to demo the design of the product but not one you can expect in the final version.

In both the Bikila and Speed cases, I can only further assume that these European importers are offloading their sales samples in anticipation of receiving the real deal in only a couple months.

Are you all as excited as I am to see the final versions of these puppies hit the market?

As we get closer, be sure to stay tuned to birthdayshoes as I'll be doing everything I can to stay on top of the Bikila (and Speed) release!

Vibram Five Fingers KSO Trek Review

Vibram Five Fingers KSO Trek Review

Back in September, I first got my feet in a pair of the kangaroo leather-clad, aggressively-lugged Five Fingers KSO Trek (See me unbox the Vibram Five Fingers KSO Trek here and also my first impressions after a trail run in Trek FiveFingers [initial review] here). Since then, I've mostly been testing them as my everyday VFFs, but I've also had the chance to hike and run in them.

Though I'll go into more detail on the KSO Treks below, in short, the Treks are a compelling, ground-breaking product that take the minimalist Five Fingers foot glove model, add super-comfy, water-resistant leather (though in total the Treks aren't waterproof), and adapt it for the type of terrain you get out in nature. Compared to standard VFFs, the Treks provide a smidge of added comfort on the trails through an ever-so-slightly thicker sole and a bit of EVA. Meanwhile, they are the most aesthetically acceptable, least freaky of the Vibram Five Fingers family. In black or brown suede-up kangaroo leather, the Treks marry form and function — they're the most likely VFFs to go unnoticed in public while allowing you to outrun a bear in the woods — in theory and if you're really fast, anyway*. If you want to pick up a pair, check out the Birthday Shoes Store for reputatble Online Retailers of Vibram Five Fingers!

Design and Aesthetic

Two factors stand out as distinguishing characteristics of the KSO Trek as compared to the standard KSO: the lugged sole, which includes 4mm EVA to protect against "stone-bruising," and the use of kangaroo leather as the main material.

The sole of the KSO Trek (Image: KSO Trek sole) has an aggressive tread that utilizes plus-shaped Vibram rubber "cleats," is beefiest and most rugged at the midfoot, and culminates at the toes with angled, ridged toes. In my testing, this tread definitely provided improved grip on loose or muddy terrain as compared to the standard VFF sole. Razor siping simply doesn't do much for your feet on ground that gives underneath your weight. I found the KSO Treks inspired confidence while bounding up steep grades at a local natural wooded park here in Atlanta.

That said, as ultra-runner Leif Rustvold put it, "[T]he Treks sacrifice a certain amount of the dynamic grip I’ve come to enjoy for the static grip of their increased tread." On the flipside, Leif remarked that in the KSO Treks he was able to "bomb down a trail" similar to how he would in traditional shoes.

As with all treaded shoes, mud can gunk up the works. That said, my KSO Treks cleared mud fairly quickly as soon as they had the chance to tread on hard packed or just less muddy ground or rockbeds.

Despite the added thickness of the KSO Trek sole, there is still a remarkable amount of information transferred from the ground to the foot. It's less than you get with KSOs, which is less than you get with Classics, but it still beats the pants off a regular shoe.

I took a few measurements at the heel, arch, and forefoot of the KSO trek and the KSO using skinfold calipers. Though I found it difficult to get consistent measurements, the chart below should give you some idea of not only the difference in thickness between KSO Trek and KSO, but also in the compressibility of the 4mm EVA midsole in the KSO Trek.

Note: I measured the heel thickness at one of the plus-sized lugs on the Treks. The forefoot thickness was measured at the row of tread behind the toes of the Treks. Similar points were measured on the standard KSOs

The lugged sole compresses comfortably on smooth surfaces (You won't feel the cleats poking you) making the KSO Treks comfortable for use on the trail, running on asphalt, or just bounding about around town or at work. By the way, if you're wondering, the EVA is easily discernible on the brown KSO Treks — it is that greyish material between the black Vibram sole and the leather (Seen in profile here).

One word of caution: the ridged toes are designed not only to snag the earth, but also to allow for upward flex of the toes. Perhaps unavoidably, this combination of grip-ability and flexibility is accomplished by way of a thin line of Vibram rubber at the base of each ridged toe that separates the toe ridges from the rest of the sole. This may be a weak point on the soles as one forum member has seen the rubber tear here (See this image from Kevin | forum discussion here).

As far as the kangaroo leather is concerned most will find it a welcome addition to the KSO Trek line. Not only is the leather buttery smooth, feeling great on your feet (The footbed is also leather), it is water-resistant (Not waterproof but the kangaroo leather does not hold water), breathes better than the synthetic material found in other VFFs. It's also intended to be durable enough to prevent snags and tears. I've not experienced any snags or tears nor have I seen any from users to date, so the stronger leather material does seem to make the Treks more durable for hard conditions.

It's also been my experience with natural materials like leather that they are less likely to acquire odors. To date, my KSO Treks have not acquired the feared VFF stank.

There have been some sole-to-leather adherence issues where the soles are detaching at the edges from the leather upper. To the extent that this has happened, wearers have re-glued using Shoe Goo or some other adhesive. If I had to guess, this is probably due to the innate problems of binding unlike materials — particularly leather. I've seen it a bit on the heels of my Treks, but it hasn't caused any problems. Hopefully, this issue will be addressed

From an aesthetic point of view, the KSO Treks are the most incognito FiveFingers to date. They look the most shoe-like and leather says "expensive" more than it says "weird." Wearing the Treks around town, my VFFs tend to go unnoticed—not sure if I like that or not, but this could be welcome to many who tire of having their feet constantly stared at by strangers!

For casual style, I like the look of the KSO Treks with cargo pants (and stroller) as seen here or perched on a rock in the VFF Treks amidst a hike here. If you're workspace is a bit more casually inclined, there are some who are sporting their Treks on the job (See Alan at work in Treks and Luis at work in Treks).

Performance of the KSO Trek

Managing a creek bed on a hike in the Smokey Mountains in the KSO Trek FiveFingers.
Managing a creek bed on a hike in the Smokey Mountains in the KSO Trek FiveFingers. Note: Those cargo pants I'm wearing have a drawstring at the hem, so you can tie them up so they don't drag with your VFFs. You can pick them up via Amazon (that's where I got mine).

The whole point of the KSO Trek, in addition to some stone-bruising protection, is "improved traction on trails and over more rugged terrain." I've used my Treks for hiking, trail running, and everyday wear.

On the trail, the Treks deliver as far as providing added traction on mud, steep inclines, and varied terrain. I found myself bounding up steep embankments with considerably more confidence than in the laser-siped standard KSO FiveFingers. I also noticed a bit less poking and prodding from random ground protrusions thanks to the compression and cushioning, as minor as it may be, from the EVA.

Again, the KSO Trek is not waterproof and water will seep into the toe pockets at the seams and through the synthetic material on the sidewalls of each toe. Even still, the additional ground clearance you get with the Treks combined with the overall use of the amazingly water-resistant leather combines for a less soaked VFF when crossing the odd creekbed.

A few VFFers have already put their Treks to somewhat extreme tests on the trail and/or road and their experiences have been overwhelmingly positive:

All in all, I've yet to find someone who wasn't satisfied with the performance of their KSO Treks.

Overall thoughts on the KSO Trek

Perching on a rock in a creek in my KSO Treks.I think the FiveFingers KSO Trek will have a permanent place in the Vibram line-up due to its impressive combination of design, performance, materials, and aesthetic — all while maintaining a minimalist form-factor (The KSO Treks weigh in at under 6 oz/each "shoe" and under 12 oz total). I find myself wearing my Treks frequently nowadays for just bumming around.

At $125 MSRP in the U.S., the KSO Trek is not cheap, unfortunately, but if you're savvy, you should be able to find a pair on sale from a local retailer or on the internet (So keep your eyes open and shop around!).

Sizing and other considerations, including KSO Treks for Women and Small-footed men

The KSO Trek sizes the same as the standard KSO with one caveat. I'm a size 43 in KSOs and I find my size 43 KSO Treks to fit exactly the same—except they are a bit more snug on the top. Unlike the KSO's stretchy synthetic fabric and mesh-upper, the KSO Trek upper is less-stretchy leather. In order for the KSO Treks to accommodate different insteps, the Trek stretches by way of slits in the leather which are bound together with stretchy synthetic material (Described as the "sock liner," see this photo and note the lines going away from the ankle — those are the slits).

On socks: many have asked if you need to size up for socks. Like most VFFs, sizing up to accommodate socks is unnecessary — exceptions being if your VFFs are already very snug (toes right up close to the end of the pocket), socks may be the "last straw" that make your feet too big. If this is you, it's highly recommended you try on a pair in person first to figure out sizing!

Overall, the KSO Treks are more snug on top of the foot compared to the standard KSO. This may be a concern for you if you have KSOs or Sprints and already know you have a high instep, typically denoted by how far the strap crosses back over the top of your foot. Forum member desaulniers covered this in a helpful video comparison of the KSO Trek with the KSO.

As of the date of this review, the Five Fingers KSO Trek is only available in men's sizes from 40 - 47. Thankfully, Vibram will be releasing the KSO Trek in late spring 2010 in women's sizes and additionally in size 38 and 39 for men (see the KSO Trek for women announcement discussion here).

Expanded sizes for men and women's KSO Treks are now available!

Note on the cargo pants pictured in this review: Those cargo pants I'm wearing have a drawstring at the hem, so you can tie them up so they don't drag with your VFFs. They're great for hiking and pretty stylish, too! You can pick them up via Amazon (that's where I got mine). Sizing is a bit tricky — I'm a 32x32 and wear a medium (I've gotten a lot of requests about where I got these pants, so that's why I'm mentioning it!).

Additional reading:

If you have any questions about the Five Fingers KSO Trek, or would like me to go into further depth on a particular part of this review, please leave feedback below.

My KSO Trek-clad feet amidst some fall leaves after a hike in the Smoky Mountains.
My KSO Trek-clad feet amidst some fall leaves after a hike in the Smoky Mountains.

* Do not take my advice as far as what to do when approached by a bear.

Disclaimer: CitySports is an online retailer that supports BirthdayShoes by way of affiliate links. Any purchases you make through CitySports links will go to supporting this VFF fan community!

See our post on "Barefoot Running Shoes" to see where KSO Treks fall on our Barefoot Running Shoes Continuum.

Laura goes Snowshoeing and takes along her Sprint VFFs

A demure Laura braved the snow to snowshoe for 5 1/2 hours in her VFF Sprints.
A demure Laura braved the snow to snowshoe for 5 1/2 hours in her VFF Sprints.
Who'd have guessed VFFs work so well for snowshoeing?
Who'd have guessed VFFs work so well for snowshoeing?

On behalf of Laura, photoed above, Chris writes:

Here's Laura in her Slate/Palm Sprints after five and a half hours of snowshoeing. For the record her boyfriend earned many brownie points with this birthday gift to her.

She was quite pleased that her toes were free and no longer being squished by her boots. Observe that she isn't wearing Injinjis. She doesn't even own toe socks! Being of Irish descent she had no problem with the cold. Her boyfriend (who submitted the pics) was cursing his decision to wear insulated slip-ons rather than his KSO's.

Just to be clear, Laura was wearing boots while snowshoeing. The Sprints went on after (and were no doubt a welcome relief for her feet).

Nice job on coming up with a creative birthday present for Laura, and thanks to Laura for letting Chris share your experience with us!

Ed Takes his FiveFingers Flow Treks out in the Snow

Ed took his FiveFingers Flow Treks (a.k.a. Trek Tex) out in the snow for a run!
Ed took his FiveFingers Flow Treks (a.k.a. Trek Tex) out in the snow for a run!

hi,
took a few pics of my flow treks in the snow in the UK, after a run.

the flow treks seem pretty good so far, they take some breaking in, but once that's done they work quite well. you can't really bend your toes downwards in them like you can in KSO's though. so far they seem quite good for cold and wet weather use, they grip much better than KSo's in wet mud. i did start to lose the feeling in my toes towards the end of the run though.

thanks,

ed

Thanks, Ed! One of these days I'll do a toe bend comparison across all the models. Needless to say you get the most flex in the Mocs, then the Classics/Sprints, the KSOs, and the KSO Treks. I haven't tried the Flows out yet, but I'd guess they're in between the KSOs and KSO Treks with the Flow Treks bringing up the rear as most resistant to toe contraction.

Sorry, that was a mouthful.

Glad to hear you're getting to test out the Five Fingers Flow Treks! I know many people over here in the States would like to grab a pair for cold-weather use.

Latest Vibram Five Fingers Reviews 1/10/10

This week's latest reviews includes a review of the Five Fingers Flow Trek:

  • Review: Vibram Five Fingers KSO Trek Tex at OpenFoo.org [Flow Trek]:

    Overall I am pleased with the Five Fingers KSO Trek Tex due to the sturdy appearance, especially the tread provides a good grip on slippery surfaces. It is a winter version of the regular KSO, but not a proper winter shoe, which can be wore all day long in winter temperatures while doing light walking. I guess sporty activities in the winter should keep your feet warm in the KSO Trek Tex, but I have not tested it yet. I would not permanently exchange my regular KSO for the KSO Trek Tex, but temporarily for winter temperatures is acceptable.

  • Barefooting It: Vibram FiveFingers at The View from Here [KSO]:

    I have only had them a short while but I can tell you that they are great. They allow me to be essentially barefoot in situations that I normally would not allow it. Whether it is exercising or going to the store these shoes deliver the comfort and performance that only barefooting can give.

  • Vibram Five Fingers: 4 Months Later at Life of Justin [KSO]:

    One of my favorite things about the shoes is how usable they are. They can be used for basically anything. I’ve worn them to the beach, in the water, hiking, playing tennis, and riding my bike. I also use them for basic things like running to the grocery store.

To see more latest Vibram Five Fingers reviews listings, go here!