Comment from: StephenB [Visitor]
StephenB

Thanks for the review. Would you by any chance be able to compare these to the Sketchers Go Bionics? I like the Sketchers, but am looking for a litte more cushion for marathon distances. Any thoughts on how the born2runs might fare for a marathon? Thanks.

11/15/12 @ 17:15
Comment from: hadi [Visitor]  
hadi

I recently read born to run and it really inspired me to change the way work out, especially running. I had knee problems, so I had a feeling it had something to do with my gait and posture when I run. I switched to Merrell Barefoot Road Glove shoes and the difference was almost instantaneous with no shin pain and knee pain. However, my arches did hurt a bit. Hopefully that will lessen with time.
The unique design of the B2R shoe really caught my eye and thanks to your favourable review, will most likely be my 2nd pair of running shoes. I think I'm just a bit worried abt the sizing because I have to order it online. I'm a size 10 US. Should I get a 1/2 size or 1 size bigger?
Awesome review!

11/15/12 @ 22:35
Comment from: greg [Member]  

@StephenB - I personally haven't tried the Skechers, so the only comparison I can comfortably make is based off another reviewer's thoughts at http://birthdayshoes.com/skechers-go-bionic-review. On paper, the stats seem pretty similar. The Skechers are about an ounce lighter. But based on the comparisons to Nike Frees, I'd venture that the Skechers are a bit more padded. B2Rs don't have much in the way of padding. I think I personally would run a marathon in B2Rs, but as you mention it really depends on how much padding you really want/need.

@hadi - I'd say order a size 10. Definitely don't go up in size, as I feel like these do run a little bigger in my experience.

Both - I'd recommend trying on a pair of zero-drop Inov8s to get a feel for size/padding comparison. It's not an exact match, but it's the closest I've seen in terms of thickness and fit.

11/16/12 @ 08:32
Comment from: Lorinc Del Motte [Visitor]  
Lorinc Del Motte

That split-toe design is not new: It's typical of Japanese "tabi" socks. The first shoe to use that pattern was the "jikatabi" invented for workmen by Shojiro Ishibashi in the 1920s (he would later found Bridgestone). This is not the first sneaker in that pattern either—I believe Marugo made one well before this.

11/16/12 @ 11:20
Comment from: Karl [Visitor]
Karl

Why must all minimalist shoes be crazy bright colors with no option for a military PT friendly color? :\

Also, you should give the Onitsuka Tiger Tai Chi's a try.

11/16/12 @ 13:02
Comment from: Scott [Visitor]
Scott

"That split-toe design is not new: It's typical of Japanese "tabi" socks. The first shoe to use that pattern was the "jikatabi" invented for workmen by Shojiro Ishibashi in the 1920s (he would later found Bridgestone). This is not the first sneaker in that pattern either—I believe Marugo made one well before this."

I have a couple of pairs of Nike Air Rifts, which have the tabi-styled split-toe design for at least 10 years.

11/16/12 @ 15:03
Comment from: greg [Member]  

@Lorinc Del Motte - You're quite right. I'd go even further and say that it's nearly impossible to do anything truly new with footwear -- which is why I think most companies spend so much time fooling around with styles and colors as opposed to function. The split-toe is still pretty unique relative to the modern trainer, though. Only other that I keep encountering are ZEMgear shoes, which I've never tried but would be interested in comparing. I think that with the success of fivefingers we're going to be seeing lots of shoe companies reaching further back for other interesting and quirky features from shoes of the past. I know Mizuno recently started incorporating features of Waraji sandals into one of their models. It's a good time to be testing shoes!

@Karl - That's a very good question. I'm not military myself, but I share your frustration to a small degree just due to a preference for simplicity. Haven't tried Onitsuka Tiger Tai Chis, but I did spend my some early months of my minimalist conversion running in Feiyue Martial Arts Shoes. Really great, cheap shoe if you need something basic to kick around in.

@Scott - Wow, I've never seen those. Are they any good? I've mostly stayed away from Nikes as they tend to be too narrow for me, but I'd be curious to know how the Air Rifts compare.

11/16/12 @ 18:59
Comment from: scott [Visitor]
scott

Well, the Air Rifts aren't minimalist...they have a quite a bit of cushion and bounce to them. But they were probably the most flexible "gym" shoe on the market when they first came out. Obviously, a google image search will show you what they look like. I don't think they sell in the US anymore, but I think the Asian market still gets them.

They are kind of femine like the VFF Classics are, with the open top part of the foot and velcro band.

11/16/12 @ 23:12
Comment from: Cody R. [Visitor]
Cody R.

the ninja turtle inspiration is awesome, i want them because of that...but i won't cause i don't need them, barefoot and all, and my neos are still alive

and these are a bit too thick for me so...yea

11/18/12 @ 14:54
Comment from: jeremy [Visitor]
jeremy

These shoes CURED my morton's neuroma! It's gone!

You should mention that with the strong foot sole placement on the outside, it encourages a very "square" foot landing. As it turns out, this works with the big toe articulating to hit 1-2 mm before the rest of the foot. The result, AMAZING landing and power from the big toe.

I'm completely sold. Love them.

04/06/13 @ 15:24
Comment from: Julia Stratman [Visitor]
Julia Stratman

Great review. How long have you had these shoes and how many miles have you put on your B2R shoes? How many miles do you think you can put on these shoes?

Thanks,
Julia

06/26/13 @ 09:56
Comment from: greg [Member]  

@Julia - I've had the shoes for a little over 9 months at this point. Since I test a lot of shoes (and since I have a preference for huaraches), these have not been my primary running shoe. However, they subbed in quite a lot during the winter.

Given that the typical recommendation for sneaker replacement of between 300-500 miles is based primarily on padding breakdown, I'd imagine that these -- like most other minimalist shoes -- could last significantly longer. I've yet to have a pair of shoes I reviewed for this site that broke down to the point of needing to be tossed.

Good form + minimal padding = long lasting shoes!

06/26/13 @ 12:32
Comment from: Paul hewitt [Visitor]
Paul hewitt

How long did it take to get them delivered? I ordered mine a week ago and not heard anything from them???

11/21/13 @ 12:40